When things get hot

General discussion about Lithops & stuff that doesn't fit anywhere else.
pvdw
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:00 am

When things get hot

Postby pvdw » Fri Dec 29, 2017 12:03 am

Temp in hothouse at 38C in the shade. Humidity at 30%

They turn like this but overnight all traces of wrinkles disappear without me watering them.
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lithops3.jpg
lithops6.jpg

pvdw
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:00 am

Re: When things get hot

Postby pvdw » Fri Dec 29, 2017 12:05 am

Some more
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lithops5.jpg
lithops5.jpg (44.45 KiB) Viewed 100 times
lithop1.jpg
lithop1.jpg (41.73 KiB) Viewed 100 times

mary44
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 10:44 pm

Re: When things get hot

Postby mary44 » Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:39 am

Wow.. Is that purely from heat? Otherwise maybe more shading? Or air flow?

Australian
Posts: 353
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 12:08 am
Location: Australia

Re: When things get hot

Postby Australian » Fri Dec 29, 2017 10:02 am

If they are fine again after the moisture of the night, then they are OK.

pvdw
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:00 am

Re: When things get hot

Postby pvdw » Fri Dec 29, 2017 5:11 pm

mary44 wrote:Wow.. Is that purely from heat? Otherwise maybe more shading? Or air flow?

Mary airflow is good. Shade is 40% which is mush more than nature. The fact that they are in pots and not in open soil make a huge difference to them tolerating heat. As Australian is mentioning below,
If they are fine again after the moisture of the night, then they are OK.


I like to see them like this. It brings out that special features that make them surviving in the veld. There way of living interest me more than the way they look.

mary44
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 10:44 pm

Re: When things get hot

Postby mary44 » Fri Dec 29, 2017 7:02 pm

pvdw wrote: Mary airflow is good. Shade is 40% which is mush more than nature. The fact that they are in pots and not in open soil make a huge difference to them tolerating heat. As Australian is mentioning below,
If they are fine again after the moisture of the night, then they are OK.


I like to see them like this. It brings out that special features that make them surviving in the veld. There way of living interest me more than the way they look.

Very interesting. I'd be interested in the plant in the lowest photo in the morning. Wouldn't they be lower into the ground in nature in heat like this with deeper roots though? And the morning cloud and mist moisture which I assume you mimic by hand spraying? (guessing here).

pvdw
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:00 am

Re: When things get hot

Postby pvdw » Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:27 pm

Mary the 2 plants in the first post are correctly planted according to nature. Only the face of the plant above grouns level. The next 2 are to much out so the sides of the plants are also exposed to the heat.

Most of these plants were cheap nursery stock. They were all to long and over watered. I had to take a guess of how they would turn out after there first leave change under my conditions. Some were correct like the first 2 and others still to "long".

These are all in 10x10cm pots. I prefer 12x12cm pots. The extra soil makes an huge difference in there ability to handle heat.

I do not mist to often. Maybe once or twice a week but nothing more. Only the spesies on the most western side of SA and Nam get regular mist from the sea. Most of the other hardly ever see mist on a regular basis.

mary44
Posts: 157
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2015 10:44 pm

Re: When things get hot

Postby mary44 » Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:41 pm

Ah, ok that makes sense. For some reason I thought some were planted in the ground. Maybe you plan to do this eventually? Must be fun to try to mimic actual growing conditions.

Australian
Posts: 353
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2015 12:08 am
Location: Australia

Re: When things get hot

Postby Australian » Fri Dec 29, 2017 11:45 pm

pvdw wrote:
These are all in 10x10cm pots. I prefer 12x12cm pots. The extra soil makes an huge difference in there ability to handle heat.

I totally agree about depth of pot as capacity of handling heat. How deep are you 12 x 12 cm pot?

pvdw
Posts: 86
Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2017 4:00 am

Re: When things get hot

Postby pvdw » Sat Dec 30, 2017 12:15 am

Australian wrote:
pvdw wrote:
These are all in 10x10cm pots. I prefer 12x12cm pots. The extra soil makes an huge difference in there ability to handle heat.

I totally agree about depth of pot as capacity of handling heat. How deep are you 12 x 12 cm pot?


The ones I bought now is 11cm at the bottom brim and 13cm all the way so the top. Soil is around 12cm deep.

I am looking at pots now made of virgin plastic. more expensive but they last many years longer than the recycled plastic ones. I do not know there exact depth yet.


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